Purpose

How does the atypical stress responsivity to stress and stressors contribute to the acquisition and persistence of and relapse to the use of illicit drugs (such as heroin and cocaine) and alcohol? The central hypothesis of this project is that atypical stress responsivity to stress and stressors contributes to the acquisition and persistence of and relapse to the use of illicit drugs (such as heroin and cocaine) and alcohol. We hypothesize and now have shown that the endogenous opioid system significantly contributes to the normal regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in humans. The HPA axis is a major contributor to the stress response in humans and all mammalian species. In humans it is a readily accessible locus for documenting and testing alterations in stress responsivity related to the addictive diseases. Previous work in this laboratory has established that opiate addiction atypical stress-responsivity of the HPA axis and the endogenous opioid system are interrelated. Our laboratory continues to examine the role of the endogenous opioid system during different stages of addictive diseases (including vulnerability acquisition persistence withdrawal and protracted abstinence).

Condition

Eligibility

Eligible Ages
Between 18 and 70
Eligible Genders
1
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
Yes

Study Design

Phase
Phase 1
Study Type
Observational

More Details

Status
Recruiting
Sponsor
Rockefeller University

Study Contact

Recruitment Office
8007822737
rucares@rockefeller.edu

Notice

Study information shown on this site is derived from this institution's local clinical trials team. The listing of studies provided is not certain to be all studies for which you might be eligible. Furthermore, study eligibility requirements can be difficult to understand and may change over time, so it is wise to speak with your medical care provider and individual research study teams when making decisions related to participation.